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Keystone Nextpreview

Access Control API

The access property of the list configuration and field configuration objects configures who can read, create, update, and delete items in your Keystone system.

import { config, createSchema, list } from '@keystone-next/keystone/schema';
import { text } from '@keystone-next/fields';
export default config({
lists: createSchema({
ListKey: list({
fields: {
fieldName: text({ access: { /* ... */ }, }),
},
access: { /* ... */ },
}),
}),
});

This document covers the complete access control API. For a guide on how to use this API to apply common patterns please see the access control guide.

List Access Control

Keystone allows you to set up access control on a per-list basis. The default access control is to allow all operations for all users. Access control is applied to the generated CRUD (create, read, update, delete) queries and mutations in the GraphQL API. Access control is applied before any hooks are executed.

You can specify access control using either concise or verbose syntax. Verbose syntax provides a separate access control rule for each operation type; create, read, update, and delete. Concise syntax provides a single access control rule which is used for all operation types.

import { config, createSchema, list } from '@keystone-next/keystone/schema';
export default config({
lists: createSchema({
ListKey: list({
// Concise access control definition
access: true,
// Verbose access control definition
access: {
create: true,
read: true,
update: true,
delete: true,
},
}),
}),
});

When using verbose syntax, any operation which is not specified will default to true.

The examples below will all use the concise syntax, however the various access control rules can all be applied using verbose syntax.

There are three different ways you can specify access-control rules: static, declarative, and imperative.

Static (list)

Static access control rules are simple boolean values. A value of true indicates that all users can perform the operation. A value of false indicates that no users can perform the operation.

A static value of false implies that the operation can never be executed. As such, Keystone will exclude the related operations and types from the GraphQL API. For example, if you set { create: false } then the mutations createItem and createItems will be removed from the GraphQL API. If you want to keep the operations in the GraphQL API while preventing all access, you can use the imperative access control rule () => false. The excluded operations can still be access by using context.sudo().

import { config, createSchema, list } from '@keystone-next/keystone/schema';
export default config({
lists: createSchema({
ListKey: list({
// Static access control definition
access: true,
}),
}),
});

Declarative (list)

Declarative access control rules are GraphQL where statements which are used as additional filters when looking up items as part of read, update, or delete operations. The access control rule can be any valid clause which could be applied as a where filter to the list in the GraphQL API.

For read operations, the access control rule is merged with any other filters in the query, and only those items which match the merged filter are returned.

For update and delete operations, the access control rule is merged with the id value to form a filter. For singular operations, e.g. updateItem or deleteItem, if the merged filter does not return an item then the mutation will return an Access Denied error. For multi-item operations, e.g. updateItems or deleteItems, if the merged filter excludes items then these will simply be ignored by the operation, giving the same behaviour as if the ID was missing.

import { config, createSchema, list } from '@keystone-next/keystone/schema';
import { checkbox } from '@keystone-next/fields';
export default config({
lists: createSchema({
ListKey: list({
fields: { isLocked: checkbox() },
// Declarative access control definition
access: { isLocked: false },
}),
}),
});

Declarative access control cannot be used for the create operation, as there is no filter being applied when creating an item. If you use declarative access control with the create operation, or with concise syntax, it is equivalent to the static access control definition true for create operations.

Declarative access control rules are rarely used directly. A more common pattern is to return a declarative access control rule from an imperative rule.

Imperative (list)

Imperative access control rules are functions which return either a boolean value or a declarative value (i.e. a GraphQL where clause). Imperative access control functions can be either synchronous or async. The function is passed a set of arguments which depends on the operation being performed. For multi-valued operations the function is only called once, and must evaluate the entire operation as a whole.

If the function returns:

  • false then an Access Denied error will be returned.
  • true then the operation will be allowed.
  • a declarative value then this will be applied to the operation as described above.
import { config, createSchema, list } from '@keystone-next/keystone/schema';
export default config({
lists: createSchema({
ListKey: list({
// Imperative access control definition
access: args => true,
}),
}),
});

Imperative Function Arguments

Imperative access control functions are passed a collection of arguments which can be used to determine whether the operation is allowed.

ArgumentDescription
listKeyThe key of the list being operated on.
operationThe CRUD operation being performed ('create', 'read', 'update', 'delete').
sessionThe current session object. See the Sessions API for details.
originalInputFor create and update operations, this is the value of data passed into the mutation. For read and delete operations this value is undefined.
itemIdThe id of the item being updated/deleted in update and delete operations. undefined for other operations.
contextThe KeystoneContext object of the originating GraphQL operation.
import { config, createSchema, list } from '@keystone-next/keystone/schema';
export default config({
lists: createSchema({
ListKey: list({
// Imperative access control definition
access: ({
listKey,
operation,
session,
originalInput,
itemId,
context,
}) => {
return true;
},
}),
}),
});

Field Access Control

Keystone also allows you to set up access control on a per-field basis. The default access control is to follow the access control rules for the parent list. Access control is applied to the generated CRU (create, read, update, but not delete) queries and mutations in the GraphQL API. Field access control is applied after list access control has been applied.

You can specify access control using either concise or verbose syntax. Verbose syntax provides a separate access control rule for each operation type; create, read, and update. Concise syntax provides a single access control rule which is used for all operation types.

import { config, createSchema, list } from '@keystone-next/keystone/schema';
import { text } from '@keystone-next/fields';
export default config({
lists: createSchema({
ListKey: list({
fields: {
fieldName: text({
access: {
// Concise access control definition
access: true,
// Verbose access control definition
access: {
create: true,
read: true,
update: true,
},
},
}),
},
}),
}),
});

When using verbose syntax, any operation which is not specified will default to true.

The examples below will all use the concise syntax, however the various access control rules can all be applied using verbose syntax.

There are two different ways you can specify field access-control rules: static and imperative.

Static (field)

Static access control rules are simple boolean values. A value of true indicates that all users can perform the operation. A value of false indicates that no users can perform the operation.

A static value of false implies that the operation can never be executed. As such, Keystone will exclude the field from the related operations and types in the GraphQL API. For example, if you set { update: false } then the field would not appear in the ItemUpdateInput and ItemsUpdateInputs types of the GraphQL API. If you want to keep the fields in the GraphQL API while preventing all access, you can use the imperative access control rule () => false. The excluded operations can still be access by using context.sudo().

import { config, createSchema, list } from '@keystone-next/keystone/schema';
import { text } from '@keystone-next/fields';
export default config({
lists: createSchema({
ListKey: list({
fields: {
fieldName: text({
// Static access control definition
access: true,
}),
},
}),
}),
});

Imperative (field)

Imperative access control rules are functions which return a boolean value. Imperative access control functions can be either synchronous or async. The function is passed a set of arguments which depends on the operation being performed. For multi-valued operations the function is called once per item, and must evaluate each item being operated on individually.

If the function returns false then an Access Denied error will be returned. If the function returns true then the operation will be allowed.

import { config, createSchema, list } from '@keystone-next/keystone/schema';
import { text } from '@keystone-next/fields';
export default config({
lists: createSchema({
ListKey: list({
fields: {
fieldName: text({
// Imperative access control definition
access: args => true,
}),
},
}),
}),
});

Imperative Function Arguments

Imperative access control functions are passed a collection of arguments which can be used to determine whether the operation is allowed.

ArgumentDescription
listKeyThe key of the list being operated on.
fieldKeyThe key of the field being operated on.
operationThe CRU operation being performed ('create', 'read', 'update').
sessionThe current session object. See the Sessions API for details.
originalInputFor create and update operations, this is the value of data passed into the mutation. For read operations this value is undefined.
contextThe KeystoneContext object of the originating GraphQL operation.
itemThe item being updated, deleted, or read. This object is an unresolved list item. See the list item API for more details on unresolved list items.
import { config, createSchema, list } from '@keystone-next/keystone/schema';
import { text } from '@keystone-next/fields';
export default config({
lists: createSchema({
ListKey: list({
fields: {
fieldName: text({
// Imperative access control definition
access: ({
listKey,
fieldKey,
operation,
session,
originalInput,
context,
item,
}) => {
return true;
},
}),
},
}),
}),
});

On this page

  • Access Control API
  • List Access Control
  • Static (list)
  • Declarative (list)
  • Imperative (list)
  • Field Access Control
  • Static (field)
  • Imperative (field)